Raspberry pi   

 

Description:

The Raspberry Pi is a remarkable device: a fully functional computer in a tiny and low-cost package. Whether you’re looking for a device you can use to browse the web or play games, are interested in learning how to write your own programs, or are looking to create your own circuits and physical devices, the Raspberry Pi – and its amazing community – will support you every step of the way. The Raspberry Pi is known as a single-board computer, which means exactly what it sounds like: it’s a computer, just like a desktop, laptop, or smartphone, but built on a single printed circuit board

Unlike a traditional computer, which hides its inner workings in a case, a Raspberry Pi has all its components, ports, and features out on display – although you can buy a case to provide extra protection, if you’d prefer. This makes it a great tool for learning about what the various parts of a computer do, and also makes it easy to learn what goes where when it comes time to plug in the various extras – known as peripherals

 

Generations of released models

The Raspberry Pi Zero, a US$5 model first introduced in 2015

The Raspberry Pi 3 B+, introduced in 2018

The Raspberry Pi 4 B, introduced in 2019

Several generations of Raspberry P is have been released. All models feature a Broadcom system on a chip (SoC) with an integrated ARM-compatible central processing unit (CPU) and on-chip graphics processing unit (GPU).

 

Processor speed ranges from 700 MHz to 1.4 GHz for the Pi 3 Model B+ or 1.5 GHz for the Pi 4; on-board memory ranges from 256 MB to 1 GB random-access memory (RAM), with up to 4 GB available on the Pi 4. Secure Digital (SD) cards in MicroSDHC form factor (SDHC on early models) are used to store the operating system and program memory. The boards have one to five USB ports. For video output, HDMI and composite video are supported, with a standard 3.5 mm tip-ring-sleeve jack for audio output. Lower-level output is provided by a number of GPIO pins, which support common protocols like I²C. The B-models have an 8P8C Ethernet port and the Pi 3, Pi 4 and Pi Zero W have on-board Wi-Fi 802.11n and Bluetooth. Prices range from US$5 to $55

The first generation (Raspberry Pi 1 Model B) was released in February 2012, followed by the simpler and cheaper Model A. In 2014, the Foundation released a board with an improved design, Raspberry Pi 1 Model B+. These boards are approximately credit-card sized and represent the standard mainline form-factor. Improved A+ and B+ models were released a year later. A “Compute Module” was released in April 2014 for embedded applications. The Raspberry Pi 2, which added more RAM, was released in February 2015.

 

Raspberry Pi Zero with smaller size and reduced input/output (I/O) and general-purpose input/output (GPIO) capabilities was released in November 2015 for US$5. On 28 February 2017, the Raspberry Pi Zero W was launched, a version of the Zero with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth capabilities, for US$10.On 12 January 2018, the Raspberry Pi Zero WH was launched, a version of the Zero W with pre-soldered GPIO headers.

 

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B was released in February 2016 with a 1.2 GHz 64-bit quad core processor, on-board 802.11n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and USB boot capabilities. On Pi Day 2018 the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ was launched with a faster 1.4 GHz processor and a three-times faster gigabit Ethernet (throughput limited to ca. 300 Mbit/s by the internal USB 2.0 connection) or 2.4 / 5 GHz dual-band 802.11ac Wi-Fi (100 Mbit/s).Other features are Power over Ethernet (PoE) (with the add-on PoE HAT), USB boot and network boot (an SD card is no longer required).

 

Raspberry Pi 4 Model B was released in June 2019 with a 1.5 GHz 64-bit quad core ARM Cortex-A72 processor, on-board 802.11ac Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 5, full gigabit Ethernet (throughput not limited), two USB 2.0 ports, two USB 3.0 ports, and dual-monitor support via a pair of micro HDMI (HDMI Type D) ports for up to 4K resolution . The Pi 4 is also powered via a USB-C port, enabling additional power to be provided to downstream peripherals, when used with an appropriate PSU. The Raspberry Pi 4 has a design flaw where third-party e-marked USB cables, such as those used on Apple MacBook’s, incorrectly identify it and refuse to provide power. This is expected to be corrected in a future board revision. Tom’s Hardware tested 14 different cables and found that 11 of them turned on and powered the Pi without issue.

 

Family

Model

Form Factor

Ethernet

Wireless

GPIO

Released

Discontinued

Raspberry Pi 1

B

Standard

(85.60 × 56.5 mm)

Yes

No

26-pin

2012

Yes

A

No

2013

Yes

B+

Yes

40-pin

2014

A+

Compact

(65 × 56.5 mm)

No

2014

Raspberry Pi 2

B

Standard

Yes

No

2015

Raspberry Pi Zero

Zero

Zero

(65 × 30 mm)

No

No

2015

W/WH

Yes

2017

Raspberry Pi 3

B

Standard

Yes

Yes

2016

A+

Compact

No

2018

B+

Standard

Yes

2018

Raspberry Pi 4

B (1GB)

Standard

Yes

Yes

2019[26]

B (2GB)

B (4GB)

 

 

 

 

Reference:

https://www.arrow.com/en/products/raspberrypi4-2gb/raspberry-pi-foundation?gclid=CjwKCAiAy9jyBRA6EiwAeclQhDVmUaXfUAIREV4UAB4RLStMrCv7yJNmQ77K_c-11fDy_RrcbAaomRoCP8gQAvD_BwE

https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/setup/

https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi-issues/Beginners_Guide_v1.pdf

https://readthedocs.org/projects/raspberry-pi-intro/downloads/pdf/latest/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raspberry_Pi

http://socialcompare.com/en/comparison/raspberrypi-models-comparison

 

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